I wake up choking

April 11, 2009

in Sleep Apnea

Do you wake up choking in the night sometimes? Then you really need to start understanding Sleep Apnea For A Good Night’s Sleep.

Sleep apnea is quite a serious problem and can turn into a life threatening situation. It is immensely essential to know about the symptoms of this disorder to identify the exact cause before it gets too late. When you know what the real problem is, seeking timely sleep apnea help is possible thereby preventing more serious problems. Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder wherein the person suffering from it ceases breathing for about 10-60 seconds. This cessation occurs a few times in a night. So if you wake up and find yourself gasping for breath, there is a possibility that you might be suffering from this disorder. Heavy sweating, getting up frequently to urinate, reduced sex drive and esophageal flux are some common symptoms of sleep apnea.

If you find yourself experiencing multiple symptoms, then it is essential to consult a physician immediately and get proper sleep apnea help. The doctor may suggest you to use a simple sleep mask. Many people have found these masks to be quite effective and there is really no need to resort to sleep medication or therapy. A sleep mask is basically made up of light-blocking fabric that can be used to cover eyes by fastening it around the head. The main purpose behind using it, is to create darkness which triggers the production of a hormone called Melatonin, which in turn directs the sleep cycle of body. Sometimes the problem could just be temporary in nature and can be treated without resorting to drastic medical treatment.

Here are two great videos on Sleep Apnea

{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

cynthia brooks October 1, 2009 at 3:39 pm

I HAVE ALWAYS SUFFERED WITH SLEEP LOSS – BUT SINCE I HAVE I BECOME OLDER I FIND MY SELF GASPING FOR AIR SOON AFTER I FALL ASLEEP (WHICH TAKES ME FOR EVER TO DO.) I WAKE WITH COUGING AND ALMOST THROWING UP SOMETIMES – THEN I AM ALMOST AFRAID TO FALL BACK TO SLEEP. MY DR. PLACED ME ON A MILD SLEEP AID – IT HELPS SOMETIMES. WHAT CAN BE THE PROBLEM. ALSO MY MOM HAS THE SAME PROBLEM AND SO DOES MY SON.

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chrystal October 10, 2009 at 3:57 am

thanks, i cant wait to try

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terry May 1, 2010 at 8:44 pm

gasping for air woke me up the other night and I felt that I couldn’t catch my breath when I finally did catch my breath I started coughing a lot

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H. Dufort October 18, 2011 at 10:11 pm

My stepfather suffered from poor sleep, snoring, teeth grinding, daytime sleepiness and mood swings for decades before being diagnosed. Over time, his condition worsened; his teeth were wearing off, and his dentist told him that he had severe sleep bruxism (teeth grinding); his teeth were so badly damaged that he had to replace most of them with implants. Guess what, severe bruxism caused some implants to break loose. It seems that his dentist never directed him to a sleep clinic.

Eventually, he developed heart problems and started gaining weight. He started suffering from narcolepsy and having memory problems. Which led to car accidents and impaired social life.

Nine years ago, he went to a sleep clinic and had his case assessed. They discovered he had a severe case of sleep apnea and very poor oxygen levels during the night. His sleep patterns were messed up and brain waves were chaotic; brain imaging showed reduced activity in the frontal lobes and irreversable damage (shrinkage) to memory-related deep brain structures.

Losing weight and using an oxygen mask for his sleep helped him get better; after a few weeks, most of his health problems were under control; narcolepsy disappeared and daytime sleepiness was reduced. His heart problems and cognitive impairment were still there, though, although he had more energy to cope and to have a better social life.

He died from an infarctus in his sleep at 76, but the oxygen mask and weight loss probably allowed him to live 8 more years in better health, and watch his grandchildren grow up for a while.

Two of his children were diagnosed with sleep apnea (including “choking up” during the night). The doctor explained that while having sleep apnea you can stop breathing for a while (up to a minute), but the central brain still modulates automatic behaviors such as swallowing saliva; having the automatic swallowing reflex while you gasp for air (after having stopped breathing for a few seconds) is likely to cause choking and distress.

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